Floating Among the #Cloud…#Services

The importance of device characterization, content adaption, and cloud services is absolutely critical to a positive Always Connected User Experience (ACUE). Today I bounced back and forth between my iPhone and Kindle 2 reading snippets of The Lost Symbol by Dan Brown (GREAT book so far, as usual from the author of The DaVinci Code).

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Without getting verbose, these were the essentials of my positive Always Connected User Experience while waiting for my car’s oil change.

  1. The page sync is automatic between the 2 devices so I never have to worry about remembering where I was. It wasn’t always this seamless…back in the stone ages of Kindle 1 I had manually sync many if not all the time.
  2. The adaptation of the content is performed to the device’s capabilities (screen size, display technology, I/O, dynamic features such as accelerometer). Obviously Apple (obvious, I think) would not have approved the Kindle for iPhone app if it had not met the specs for what they typically consider as a stellar user experience. In a nutshell, it just works!
  3. Yes, the content does in fact reside locally on both devices, so it’s not what I’d call a classical “connected cloud service”, but the content originates and remains available in the cloud no matter what I do locally on the devices. If I wipe my iPhone, I just reload the app and book, and I’m right back to the same page I left off on.

One key element of the overall ACUE equation is the transport media, but since the content is cached locally on the device (probably always will be) this is not as important other than the time to download. Where this becomes important is when less of the content resides locally and what the device side gets is rendering of the content. So if Amazon were actually rendering the book content and pushing me each page as I flip to the next page, I will be begin to care very much whether I’m connected over HSPA, WiFi, or EDGE. I’ll also care about the quality of the connection if I’m moving. Imagine the sorts of outages or failed calls on the iPhone in some of the dreaded “coverage holes” in the San Francisco bay area when I’m immersed in a really good publication or book.

There are many other items such as security, authentication, e-commerce, and so forth that I’m leaving out and of course must be built into the equation. But from the non-technical users perspective, once they signed up for their account on Amazon and purchased their Kindle, they just want it to work without needing any knowledge of an unreliable cellular network, fading, channel congestion, or roaming.

Are we there yet? Ehh, kinda sorta. We’re definitely getting there as users push the capabilities of the applications, services and devices. Apps, services and devices push the capabilities of the network. And the networks push the capabilities of the carriers to react innovatively and expeditiously. Do you agree or disagree?

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